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MyDigitalSSD BPX Pro 240GB SSD Review

MyDigitalSSD BPX Pro 240GB SSD Review
The third and final BPX Pro review this month is ready. The 240GB version steps away from the competition in performance yet still costs less.
By: Chris Ramseyer | SSDs in Storage | Posted: Oct 4, 2018 3:00 pm

Introduction

 

Like the 480GB model, the 240GB MyDigitalSSD BPX Pro is a strong NVMe SSD that you should consider when choosing your next storage drive. The drive delivers very good application performance in a capacity where we often see less than satisfactory results.

 

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256GB SSDs are the new 128GB drives. The latest flash is twice the size it was just two years ago, so 256GB really is the new 128GB when you count the number of die. With SSDs, performance comes from spreading the reads and writes across a number of die. The more, the better. With companies increasing the amount of data each die can hold, we read and write to less die.

 

To combat the loss of parallelization, flash companies have increased the bus speed from the controller to the flash. This has helped and new 256GB SSDs are not as slow as previous generation 128GB SSDs. They just are not as fast as higher capacity models with more flash die to spread the workload.

 

Not all drives scale the same way from large capacities to smaller sizes. Some drives lose a lot of application performance and others, like the MyDigitalSSD BPX Pro, don't seem to have much of a problem.

 

 

 

Specifications

 

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CrystalDiskMark Performance

 

Expected Release Data Mid-October

 

The BPX Pro is shipping in three capacities already, and a large 2TB model will ship in mid-October. We welcome the "new" four-capacity lineup that includes a very large capacity option and omits the traditional 128GB class that no longer makes sense from an economic standpoint.

 

The sequential read performance spikes at 3,400 for all four capacities. Sequential writes scale with the capacity. The 256GB drive achieves just 1,100 MB/s and grows in 1,000 MB/s with each size to 2,100 MB/s for the 480GB and 3,100 MB/s for the 960TB and 1920TB models.

 

MyDigtialSSD measures claimed performance with CrystalDiskMark, so the random numbers come in the form of throughput. In our testing, we measured around 13,000 IOPS at queue depth 1 and for most desktop workloads that's the number you care about.

 

Even though the BPX Pro is the first product with the new Phison PS5012-E12 (E12 from this point forward in the review), we've showed performance previously in tradeshow coverage and preview articles that detail the architecture and hardware specific features.

 

The design is straightforward with the E12 controller and Toshiba BiCS FLASH 3 TLC memory. The controller features end-to-end data path protection. MyDigitalSSD didn't enable the user encryption modes on the BPX Pro so you will not have accelerated eDrive or TCG Opal support.

 

 

Pricing, Warranty, And Endurance

 

BPX Pro pricing starts at just $74.99 (240GB) with drives available on Amazon and MyDigitalDiscount.com. The 480GB sells for $129.99 and that grows to $259.99 for the 1TB model. The 2TB currently has a tentative price of $569.99 with that size shipping in the coming weeks.

 

The BPX Pro series carries a 5-year limited warranty. MyDigitalSSD is not trying to gouge anyone with the endurance coverage. The 1TB model gives users 1,665 terabytes written (TBW) under the warranty terms. That's more than 1,000 TBW more than the HP EX920 and Adata SX8200 in the same 1TB capacity class. The range moves steadily from 380 TBW (240GB model) to 3115 TBW (1920GB model).

 

A Closer Look

 

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The BPX Pro 240GB, along with the 480GB, uses a single sided design. The two larger drives place components on both sides of the circuit board. Neither should be an issue since most motherboards and notebooks support double-sided M.2 SSDs.

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